Monday, October 24, 2016

Election Behavior Quiz

In many instances, a voter who wants to carry a firearm to vote is no issue because the polls are located at gun-free schools. But what about a polling place located at a church or municipal building? Under current law, a voter is entitled to strap on his six-shooter.  Given that police must stay at least 100' away, this concerns me. Governing reports that very few states regulate firearms at the voter booth.

Here's a quiz.

1) If someone comes into the polls wearing a "Hillary" or "Trump" T-shirt, should he be asked to leave and wear more neutral clothing?

2) Are reporters allowed inside the polls?

3) Is there any problem with a person talking on his cell phone while waiting to vote, or snapping pictures around him?

4) Most the name and party of a person coming in to vote be announced? Isn't the voter entitled to some privacy?

5) What about those annoying people who rush over to you the second you get out of your car? Shouldn't they take a hike?

6) If my father or mother is unable to see, can I go into the voting booth with him and help him vote?

I'll answer these questions tomorrow. If you have additional questions, post them in the comments. If I am unable to answer you, I'll find out from elections officials.

34 comments:

Anonymous said...

Why are you against the second amendment when someone is voting. Isn't that the point of voting? Is the constable armed?

Bernie O'Hare said...

Most are not. I'm fior the right to vote, which comes in front of the second amendment.

Anonymous said...

How is voting in the first amendment? Also why is the order of the amendments important? That is BS, one is just as important as any other. Are guns banned in a polling place?

Anonymous said...

What is the appropriate course of action if a group armed or unarmed shows up at a polling loction with the appearance to intimidate? What actions can a voter take. While I have never seen that in all my years voting, I suspect there is a chance this year given the recent rehtoric.

Anonymous said...

There is no constitutional right to vote Bernie. Sorry.

Anonymous said...

If someone tries to intimidate me at the polls, they're going to be seriously injured.

Anonymous said...

5:28 I suggest you obtain some red pepper spray and aim for their eyes if you feel threatened in any way by thugs at the polls

Anonymous said...

Since you mentioned candidates Bernie, if I see someone wearing a shirt of a candidate I don't care for, my first instinct is to ignore them as they're not bothering me. If they begin to electioneer, some red pepper spray will end that quickly.

Anonymous said...

You cane wear a shirt into the polling place to cast your vote, you need to do no political speech while in there, you vote and then you leave. That is all you are allowed to do

Bernie O'Hare said...

"There is no constitutional right to vote Bernie. Sorry."

Are you out of your mind? Voting is the most basic form of expression and is protectedby the first amendment. In addition, four separate Amendments – 15th, 19th, 24th, and 26th – se the same powerful language to protect it: “The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged . . . .”

Bernie O'Hare said...

4:23, I like to think that the amendments are ranked in order of importance, but that's purely my own way of looking at it. I would argue that the First Amendment is the most basic and important of them all, and that all other rights flow from it.

Anonymous said...

Please quote the article in the Constitutions Bernie. You'll find there is no constitutional right to vote. Here is the first amendment, verbatim.

Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances

Not even a word that begins with a "V". Sorry.

Bernie O'Hare said...

Voting is the most basic form of speech. If spending to influence voters is considered robust speech (See Citizens United), it necessarily follows that the act of voting is itself protected speech.

In addition, and as I pointed out, the right to vote is specifically mentioned in four separate amendments.

Anonymous said...

The Fifteenth Amendment says the following in Section One

Section 1. The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of race, color, or previous condition of servitude.

Now it states that the right of citizens to vote will not be denied "on account of race, color, or previous condition of servitude.", however, it does not say a citizen has a "right to vote". It just says that citizens can not be denied the right to vote BY THE STATES for specific reasons. The right is only implied, but not specified elsewhere in the Constitution.



The Nineteenth Amendment is an extension of the Fifteenth, inasmuch:

The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex.

Again, no specific "right to vote" for all citizens. It just talks about denying an implied right to vote. The 24th and 26th is the same. They presume an implied "right to vote", but nowhere in the constitution does it specifically provide for the right.

Anonymous said...

The "right to vote" is in the same category as the "right to secede" which was never decided by the supreme court, even after the Civil War, and the Constitution itself is murky about. Now we all understand that the right is implied, and for the history of our republic, that's been the de-facto case, but there is no specific language granting citizens the right to vote.

Bernie O'Hare said...

I don't want to get into an extended discussion on this point in a story that is primarily about the conduct of elections, but it is clear that voting is constitutionally protected. Under your twisted view of the 1st amendment, the framers would be obliged to point out what kinds of speech are protected and what kinds are not. I have also referred to four separate amendments containing this language; "“The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged . . . .” That necessarily means there is a right to vote.

Anonymous said...

When it comes to twisting our Constitution Mr O'Hare, all one has to do is look at the Obamacare decision by the Supreme Court to determine its Constitutionality. Finding rights that aren't there seem to be a specialty of the Roberts Court.

Bernie O'Hare said...

As I've said, this post is about the conduct of elections, not the constitutionality of Obamacare.

Anonymous said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
Bernie O'Hare said...

No comments on Clinton-Trump.

Anonymous said...

Any problem with registering in multiple states and voting absentee in each of them?

Dennis P said...


1) If someone comes into the polls wearing a "Hillary" or "Trump" T-shirt, should he be asked to leave and wear more neutral clothing? ---- Answer --- If he or she had a political pin on the shirt - it must come off ... And ne political literature can be handed out at the poll ... It is legal for the voters not the poll workers to wear a political tee --- They can only vote and go


2) Are reporters allowed inside the polls? They are discouraged

3) Is there any problem with a person talking on his cell phone while waiting to vote, or snapping pictures around him? No pictures are supposed to be taken and cell phones are asked to be turned off ...

4) Most the name and party of a person coming in to vote be announced? Isn't the voter entitled to some privacy? This is touchy ... In primaries the party is supposed to be called out of the person voting to allow the machine operator to set up the machine for the proper party ... Separate voting machines for parties are disallowed ... We now have computers and they must be set up too ...Voters are given papers which they give to the machine operator with their party and the machine operator creates a card which they use in the machine with their party on it bringing up the right screen.... But technically the party of the voter still must be announced

Dennis P said...

5) What about those annoying people who rush over to you the second you get out of your car? Shouldn't they take a hike? Maybe they should but they are allowed to be 10 feet outside the building where the poll is ... As far as signs outside these polls ... Owners of the property where the poll is can restrict or forbid signs

6) If my father or mother is unable to see, can I go into the voting booth with him and help him vote? Most polls have a device that would allow you father and mother to vote without a video screen ... But voters who have a handicap can bring people into the polling booth to assist them to vote if they sign a document at the polling booth declaring the reason why assistance is needed...

Anonymous said...

If you are a convicted felon, do you have the right to vote. I don't think so. That kind of puts the "right to vote" theory to rest.

Anonymous said...

For example can Jim Gregory vote?

Anonymous said...

Don't know if he is a felon or not, just curious.

Bernie O'Hare said...

I'll have your answer tomorrow.

Anonymous said...

Under Pennsylvania law, people with a criminal record who have been released from prison, or who will be freed by the time of the election, are eligible to vote. This is true even if they are on parole or probation. Only those people who are incarcerated on a felony conviction are not allowed to vote.

Anonymous said...

1) If someone comes into the polls wearing a "Hillary" or "Trump" T-shirt, should he be asked to leave and wear more neutral clothing? Yes.

2) Are reporters allowed inside the polls? No.

3) Is there any problem with a person talking on his cell phone while waiting to vote, or snapping pictures around him? Yes.

4) Most the name and party of a person coming in to vote be announced? No. Isn't the voter entitled to some privacy? Yes.

5) What about those annoying people who rush over to you the second you get out of your car? Shouldn't they take a hike? No.

6) If my father or mother is unable to see, can I go into the voting booth with him and help him vote? Yes.

Anonymous said...

In line with what is and is not allowed at polls maybe someone out there can answer my question. Is Pennsylvania an open carry state? Can you buy a handgun and carry it on your hip in the open without getting a concealed weapons permit?

Bernie O'Hare said...

I have repeatedly deleted numerous comments posted anonymously about the a presidential race. This post is not about the merits of the candidates, but about behavior at the polls. I realize you have no respect for anyone, but there are people who are interested in what I write about.You can troll this blog, and I will just continue to delete you. Start your own blog.

Anonymous said...

Thank you Bernie, what is with all the Clinton stuff? I like the question asked by 9:11. Does anyone know. I have a feeling there are more than a few of those Clinton haters that know the answer.

Bernie O'Hare said...

I will answer the question tomorrow.

Robert Trotner said...

Bernie, those people questioning the importance of the fundamental right of voting must be opposed to our republican form of government. Lol.